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May 14, 2010 8

Friday Food Definition: Rousong or Thit Cha Bong (Thịt chà bông)

By in Asian, Friday Food Definition

This week’s FFD is a video blog. I’ve only made one once before, so I’m still a video neophyte. The video below was my first and only take. Had my roomie not come home so soon, I would have maybe tried a few more times to speak slower, corrected myself when I said “minced”, the word I was looking for was “pulled.” I would have also put on some prettier clothes, slapped on some make up, and taken off some shine. Doh!

There is a Vietnamese meat called thịt chà bông. I have never researched it before but I grew up eating it. I assumed it was a Vietnamese specific dish but like many other Asian dishes, there’s apparently overlap amongst the other Asian countries. I was describing this to Thomas and he alerted me that in Chinese, our “cha bong” or “thịt chà bông” is called “rousong.” Here’s the wikipedia link. When you look up thịt chà bông on wikipedia, you are directed to their page for rousong. In the video, I show you the loot I have in my fridge that my mom made for me.

Bonus: I roped Thomas into doing a sound byte about rousong.

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Well, I hope you have a wonderful weekend! Tonight, the boyfriend and I are going to see Conan O’Brien’s Legally Prohibited from Being Funny on Televison Tour. Can’t wait. We’re Team Coco!

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  • meffy

    I think that was a really cool little bit of video blogging there m’dear. I thought you looked gorgeous. I love the video blogs. I hadn’t realized how much I missed your face. Did Thomas say that it’s eaten with breakfast?

  • http://girleatsworld.curious-notions.net linda

    thanks meffy
    i’m experimenting and feel a bit awkward

    yes! apparently it’s a popular breakfast? i saw that also in the wikipedia link that it’s a breakfast thing.

  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/thomas350 Thomas

    Yeah.. We usually eat congee for breakfast. Rousong is pretty much one of the standard toppings for me

  • http://adelnye.diaryland.com adelnye

    We translate it as floss in English, in Singapore. You can get it as pork floss, chicken floss, fish floss or even beef floss. My favourite’s pork floss, but the customs here don’t allow it to be sent through from home… quite annoying really, cos I don’t know how to make it either. :(

  • http://superduperfantastic.net/ suki

    :) i usually see it in a much darker form. probably coloring and depending on what type it is. don’t know how to make it, but it is available in stores here.

    • Linda

      Suki,
      yeah, i’ve seen it boxed at sandwich shops and asian markets. i havent had any other kind but the pork kind so maybe different kinds of meats and soy sauces?
      - linda

  • http://mykafkaesquelife.blogspot.com/ My Kafkaesque Life

    Oh, it’s floss… :) It’s very common in Chinese dishes and I’ve had that in Singapore, Malaysia and Taiwan. It’s actually very dry, when you eat a lot of it, it kinda sticks all around your mouth, hehe. But it tastes good.

    Gread video again and I will be checking your future vlogs for sure :) You have a very nice way to explain things. Wish I was as fluent in English as you. But even, if I was, I don’t have such a lovely face, to put in front of the cam ;-)

  • http://girleatsworld.curious-notions.net linda

    adelyne,
    I missed your comment!
    i’ve never hada anything but pork floss. am very curious the differences between the meats!
    maybe I’ll get my mom to video how she makes her pork floss

    Oh Kalkaesque, you always flatter me /make me blush.
    you’re such a well traveled dude. Have been living vicariously through your blog for a while now!
    - linda